Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

I must admit that my motivation to read this book came from the book and TV series by Michael Palin (who attempted to go around the world in eighty days strangely enough in the 1980s). Palin’s journey was inspired by this classic. 

As you can probably guess, this book deals with Phileas Fogg’s attempt to go around the world in eighty days in the 1800s. Accompanied by his new but trusty servant, Passepartout, he leaves the Reform Club, London promising to return back in exactly eighty days. Armed with a book of timetables of ships and trains (as well as good luck), they begin their journey. However, Detective Fix is on Fogg’s trail, suspecting him of stealing from the Bank of England. Add to this a ride on an elephant, rescue of a young widow, a meeting with the Sioux and a circus troupe (not at the same time) and like Fogg, this book never stops. One thing you will learn is longitude and latitude in an important but fun way!

I found this book fast paced and interesting. It read like a modern book to me, I had no problems with language or dreary bits. Fogg’s trip was interesting from both a cultural and historical perspective. Passepartout was just gorgeous with his devotion to Fogg and his journey. Okay, so it’s dated and the world has changed, but it was written a long time ago!

If you’ve never read a classic, I suggest you start with this one – it’s short and feels completely modern.

9 out of 10.

8 thoughts on “Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

Add yours

  1. I love Jules Verne, such for adventure! Heh, I think it’s wonderful what inspires people to read books, it can be the weirdest/funnest things. And Michael Palin is very inspiring! 🙂

  2. I found it face paced and interesting, too. I’d never read Jules Verne before, but when one of my third graders (from Russia) was reading it a few years ago, I decided I certainly should have read it myself!

    Now I’m looking forward to more of his stuff, maybe the 20,000 Leagues under The Sea?

  3. If you’ve never read a classic, I suggest you start with this one – it’s short and feels completely modern.

    That is a strong line Sam.
    I have just bought The Hunchback of Notredame for my 1st Classic books. After reading your review,I should have chosen this book 1st

    1. Ah, it’s just that I hated classics with a passion at school and didn’t recover until a few years ago. I think this book would appeal to both sexes at any age. Haven’t read The Hunchback of Notre Dame, but I really enjoyed Jane Eyre too.

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